THOMAS MERTON’S PRAYER FOR PENTECOST

Sunday, May 20 was the beginning of the season of Pentecost. Here is Thomas Merton’s prayer for the Vigil of Pentecost. It’s long but worth reading and praying in its entirety.

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Today, Father, this blue sky lauds you. The delicate green and orange flowers of the tulip poplar tree praise you. The distant blue hills praise you together with the sweet-smelling air that is full of brilliant light. The bickering flycatchers praise you together with the lowing cattle and the quails that whistle over there. I too, Father, praise you, with all these my brothers, and they all give voice to my own heart and to my own silence. We are all one silence and a diversity of voices.

You have made us together, you have made us one and many, you have placed me here in the midst as witness, as awareness, and as joy. Here I am. In me the world is present and you are present. I am a link in the chain of light and of presence. You have made me a kind of centre, but a centre that is nowhere. And yet I am “here,” let us say I am “here” under these trees, not others.

For a long time I was in darkness and in sorrow, and I suppose my confusion was my own fault. No doubt my own will has been the root of my sorrow, and I regret it merciful father, but I do not regret it because this formula is acceptable as an official answer to all problems. I know I have sinned, but the sin is not to be found in any list. Perhaps I have looked to hard at all the lists to find out what my sin was and I did not know that it was precisely the sin of looking at all the lists when you were telling me that this was useless. My “sin” is not on the list, and is perhaps not even a sin. In any case I cannot know what it is, and doubtless there is nothing there anyway.

Whatever may have been my particular stupidity, the prayers of your friends and my own prayers have somehow been answered and I am here, in this solitude, before you, and I am glad because you see me here. For it here, I think, that you want to see me, and I am seen by you. My being here is a response you have asked of me, to something I have not clearly heard. But I have responded, and I am content: there is little to know about it at present.

Here you ask of me nothing else than to be content that I am your Child and your Friend. Which simply means to accept your friendship because it is your friendship and your Fatherhood because I am your son. This friendship is Son-ship and is Spirit. You have called me here to be repeatedly born in the Spirit as your son. Repeatedly born in light, in knowledge, in unknowing, in faith, in awareness, in gratitude, in poverty, in presence and in praise.

If I have any choice to make, it is to live here and perhaps die here. But in any case it is not the living or the dying that matter, but speaking your name with confidence in this light, in this unvisited place: to speak your name of “Father” just by being here as “son” in the Spirit and the Light which you have given , and which are no unearthly light but simply this plain June day, with its shining fields, its tulip trees, the pines, the woods, the clouds and the flowers everywhere.

To be here with the silence of Sonship in my heart is to be a centre in which all things converge upon you. That is surely enough for the time being.

Therefore Father, I beg you to keep me in this silence so that I may learn from it the word of your peace and the word of your mercy and the word of your gentleness to the world: and that through me perhaps your word of peace may make itself heard where it has not been possible for anyone to hear it for a long time.

To study truth here and learn here to suffer for truth.

The Light itself, and the contentment and the Spirit, these are enough.

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WEEKLY PRAYER

A prayer from John Wesley (1703-1791):

O Lord, take full possession of my heart, raise there your throne,
and command there as you do in heaven.
Being created by you, let me live for you;
being created for you, let me always act for your glory;
being redeemed by you, let me give to you what is yours;
and let my spirit cling to you alone, for your name’s sake.

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FRIDAY FAVORITES FOR PRAYER AND WRITING

Welcome to Friday Favorites, my weekly round-up of posts about prayer, writing, and living the contemplative and connected life. I hope you’ll enjoy this week’s finds.

As always, if you have someone else’s article or post you’d like to see featured, please let me know by Thursday at noon.

Be blessed!

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Love Each Other Deeply via April Yamasaki (a beautiful litany for Mother’s Day, which is this Sunday)

What’s the difference between Ignatian Spirituality and Centering Prayer? via Carl McColman (exploring the differences between two historical prayer practices)

For the Ones in Hiding via Tasha Burgoyne (what if our fragility is the one thing that we all have in common?)

You’d Never Know It From Looking At Her via Alia Joy (for those who need to know that they are not alone)

What To Do When Other People’s Words Leave You Feeling Bad via Traci Rhoades (when you’re haunted by hurtful words)

You Are Not The Problem via Heather Caliri (on the struggle of writing and learning to write)

Remember This the Next Time You Are Rejected via Courtney E. Martin (if you’ve ever applied to something or submitted your work, you need to read this letter)

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I also wanted to remind you, friends, about the upcoming Writers’ Retreat hosted by Andi Cumbo-Floyd, Shawn Smucker, and Kelly Chripczuk on June 22-24 in Radiant, Va. Read about it here and join us for 3 days dedicated to recharging, relaxing, and refocusing on our writing life.

Writers Retreat1

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Learn how your support can keep this website running: Support Us Today

 

 

WEEKLY PRAYER: JULIAN OF NORWICH

The English mystic Julian of Norwich (1342 – c. 1416) is remembered on May 8 (in the Anglican, Episcopalian, and Lutheran churches). This week, let’s pray one of her beautiful prayers:

In you, Father all-mighty, we have our preservation and our bliss.
In you, Christ, we have our restoring and our saving.
You are our mother, brother, and Saviour.
In you, our Lord the Holy Spirit, is marvellous and plenteous grace.
You are our clothing; for love you wrap us and embrace us.
You are our maker, our lover, our keeper.
Teach us to believe that by your grace all shall be well, and all shall be well,
and all manner of things shall be well. Amen

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WEEKLY PRAYER: ST. PATRICK

A prayer from St. Patrick (excerpted from St. Patrick’s Breastplate):

Christ with me,
Christ before me,
Christ behind me,
Christ in me,
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ on my right,
Christ on my left,
Christ when I lie down,
Christ when I sit down,
Christ when I arise,
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.

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FRIDAY FAVORITES FOR PRAYER AND WRITING

Welcome back to Friday Favorites after a hiatus of a couple weeks. I was at the Festival of Faith and Writing one week, and last week had some computer problems (I’m sure you know what that’s like . . .). I’m glad to be back and bringing you some of my favorite finds related to prayer, writing, and being and living well.

Many of today’s Friday Favorites feature writers I met for the first time at the Festival of Faith and Writing a couple weeks ago. It was wonderful to meet these writers in person, and it’s a joy to show you their work; I know that you’ll be blessed by these pieces.

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Saying Yes and Staying Humble: Lesson 1 from the Festival of Faith and Writing via Amanda Cleary Eastep (a report from the Festival about humility, God, gifts, and saying yes to books and writing)

Call for Creative Communion via Sister Julia Walsh (on worshiping, creating, and receiving in vulnerability and community)

In April (poem) via Prasanta Verma (a poem of awakening)

Dread Leads You Deeper via Tara Owens (Tara shares an excerpt from a wonderful new book, Mystics and Misfits: Meeting God Through St. Francis and Other Unlikely Saints, by Christiana Peterson)

Still Life via Michael Wright (I recommend this enriching newsletter about art, poetry, and life)

Speak Easy via Patricia Raybon (biblical counsel on keeping our words loving and short)

Being is the Greatest Act of Resistance via Carolina Hinojosa-Cisneros (in the work of justice and peacemaking, we remain faithful to the call on our lives)

Write Your Own Obituary via Ann Kroeker (Ann suggests a unique exercise for creative writing and for life)

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The Contemplative Writer is ad-free and never shares sponsored content, but it is a lot of work to maintain. We rely on affiliate links from the books we share and the generous donations of our readers. Even a gift of $5 goes a long way to sustaining our mission to provide contemplative prayer resources for our readers.

Learn how your support can keep this website running: Support Us Today

WEEKLY PRAYER

Pilot of the soul,
Guide of the righteous,
and Glory of the saints:
grant us, O Lord, eyes of knowledge ever to see thee
and ears also to hearken unto thy word alone.
When our souls have been filled with thy grace,
create in us pure hearts, O Lord,
that we may ever understand thy greatness,
who art good and a lover of men.
O our God, be gracious to our souls,
and grant unto us thy humble servants
who have received thy body and blood,
a pure and steadfast mind,
for thine is the Kingdom, O Lord,
blessed and glorious, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

— an Ethiopian liturgical prayer (source)

WEEKLY PRAYER: CATHERINE OF SIENA

A prayer from St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380):

O Holy Spirit, come into my heart;
by your power draw it to yourself, God,
and give me charity with fear.

Guard me, Christ, from every evil thought,
and so warm and enflame me again
with your most gentle love
that every suffering may seem light to me.

My holy Father and my gentle Lord,
help me in my every need.
Christ love! Christ love!

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